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Forms & Genres


 

Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7

Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7
$160.00

A thorough examination of Shostakovich’s string quartets is long overdue. Although they can justifiably lay claim to being the most significant and frequently performed twentieth-century oeuvre for that ensemble, there has been no systematic English-language study of the entire cycle. Judith Kuhn’s book begins such a study, undertaken with the belief that, despite a growing awareness of the universality of Shostakovich’s music, much remains to be learned from the historical context and an examination of the music’s language. Much of the controversy about Shostakovich’s music has been related to questions of meaning. The conflicting interpretations put forth by scholars during the musicological ‘Shostakovich wars’ have shown the impossibility of fixing a single meaning in the composer’s music. Commentators have often heard the quartets as political in nature, although there have been contradictory views as to whether Shostakovich was a loyal communist or a dissident. The works are also often described as vivid narratives, perhaps a confessional autobiography or a chronicle of the composer’s times. The cycle has also been heard to examine major philosophical issues posed by the composer’s life and times, including war, death, love, the conflict of good and evil, the nature of subjectivity, the power of creativity and the place of the individual – and particularly the artist – in society. Soviet commentaries on the quartets typically describe the works through the lens of Socialist-Realist mythological master narratives. Recent Western commentaries see Shostakovich’s quartets as expressions of broader twentieth-century subjectivity, filled with ruptures and uncertainty. What musical features enable these diverse interpretations? Kuhn examines each quartet in turn, looking first at its historical and biographical context, with special attention to the cultural questions being discussed at the time of its writing. She then surveys the work’s reception history, and follows with a critical discussion of the quartet’s architectural and harmonic features. Using the new tools of Sonata Theory, Kuhn provides a fresh analytical approach to Shostakovich’s music, giving valuable and detailed insights into the quartets, showing how the composer’s mastery of form has enabled these works to be heard as active participants in the Soviet and Western cultural discourses of their time, while remaining compelling and relevant to twenty-first-century listeners.

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)
$160.00

Beginning with a reassessment of contemporary romantic studies, this book provides a modern critical comparison of Keats and Shelley. The study offers detailed close readings of a variety of literary genres (including the romance, lyric, elegy and literary fragment) adopted by Keats and Shelley to explore their poetic treatment of self and form. The poetic careers of Keats and Shelley embrace a tragic affirmation of those darker elements latent in the earlier writings to meditate on their own posthumous reception and reputation. Fresh readings of Keats and Shelley show how they conceive of the self as fictional and anticipate Nietzsche’s modern theories of subjectivity. Nietzsche’s conception of the subject as a site of conflicting fictions usefully measures this emergent sense of poetic self and form in Keats and Shelley. This Nietzschean perspective enriches our appreciation of the considerable artistic achievement of these two significant second-generation romantic poets.

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)
$160.00

By taking account of the ways in which early modern women made use of formal and generic structures to constitute themselves in writing, the essays collected here interrogate the discursive contours of gendered identity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. The contributors explore how generic choice, mixture, and revision influence narrative constructions of the female self in early modern England. Collectively they situate women’s life writings within the broader textual culture of early modern England while maintaining a focus on the particular rhetorical devices and narrative structures that comprise individual texts. Reconsidering women’s life writing in light of recent critical trends-most notably historical formalism-this volume produces both new readings of early modern texts (such as Margaret Cavendish’s autobiography and the diary of Anne Clifford) and a new understanding of the complex relationships between literary forms and early modern women’s ‘selves’. This volume engages with new critical methods to make innovative connections between canonical and non-canonical writing; in so doing, it helps to shape the future of scholarship on early modern women.

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)
$160.00

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)
$158.00

This book presents a perspective on genre based on what it is that leads users of a language to recognise a communicative event as an instance of a particular genre. Key notions in this perspective are those of prototype, inheritance, and intertextuality; that is, the extent to which a text is typical of the particular genre, the qualities or properties that are inherited from other instances of the communicative event, and the ways in which a text is influenced by other texts of a similar kind. The texts which form the basis of this discussion are drawn from experimental research reporting in English.Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Approaches to genre 3. Genre and frames 4. A sample analysis: Writing up research 5. Summary and conclusions.

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives
$155.00

For the first time, the major theoretical and pedagogical approaches to genre and related issues of social construction are presented in a single volume, providing an overview of the state of the art for practitioners in applied linguistics, ESL/EFL pedagogies, rhetoric, and composition studies around the world. Unlike volumes that present one theoretical stance, this book attempts to give equal time to all theoretical and pedagogical camps. Included are chapters by authors from the Sydney School, the New Rhetoric, and English for Specific Purposes, as well as contributions from other practitioners who pose questions that cross theoretical lines. Genre in the Classroom: *includes all of the major theoretical views of genre that influence pedagogical practice; *takes an international approach, drawing from all parts of the world in which genre theory has been applied in the classroom–Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the Middle East, the United States; *features contributors who are all both theorists and classroom practitioners, lending credibility and authenticity to the arguments; *combines theory and practice in every chapter, showing how particular theoretical views influence classroom practice; *grounds pedagogical practices in their own regional and theoretical histories; *openly discusses problems and questions that genre theory raises and presents some of the solutions suggested; and *offers a concluding chapter that argues for two macro-genres, and with responses to this argument by noted genre theorists from three theoretical camps.

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)
$143.00

How genres emerge and evolve on the Internet has become one of the central questions in studies of computer-mediated communication (CMC). This book addresses the issue of genrefication by giving an in-depth analysis of email hoaxes as a candidate for digital genre status. Email hoaxes are deceptive messages that spread in digital social networks; they are a fascinating object for discourse linguistics as they exemplify a major pragmatic tendency in CMC, namely deceptivity and a lowering of sincerity standards. This study examines formal and functional aspects of email hoaxes and provides ample evidence both from a systematized corpus and in situ data collected online. Besides a structural and microlinguistic analysis, it identifies key issues such as pragmatic duality, narrativity and textual variation and change in email hoaxes. In conclusion, a digital genre model is outlined that bridges both the old/new and the formal/functional gaps and may be applied to many other digital genre ecologies.

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)
$140.00

In this bold study James M. Decker argues against the commonly held opinion that Henry Miller’s narratives suffer from ‘formlessness’. He instead positions Miller as a stylistic pioneer, whose place must be assured in the American literary canon. From Moloch to Nexus through such widely-read texts as Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, Decker examines what Miller calls his ‘spiral form’, a radically digressive style that shifts wildly between realism and the fantastic. Drawing on a variety of narratological and critical sources, as well as Miller’s own aesthetic theories, he highlights that this fragmented narrative style formed part of a sustained critique of modern spiritual decay. A deliberate move rather than a compositional weakness, then, Miller’s style finds a wide variety of antecedents in the work of such figures as Nietzsche, Rabelais, Joyce, Bergson and Whitman, and is viewed by Decker as an attempt to chart the journey of the self through the modern city. Henry Miller and Narrative Form affords readers new insights into some of the most challenging writings of the twentieth century and provides a template for understanding the significance of an extraordinary and inventive narrative form.

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre
$125.00

This wide-ranging and original book reappraises the role of genre, and genre theory, in British Romanticism. Analyzing numerous examples from 1760 to 1830, David Duff examines the generic innovations and experiments which propel the Romantic ‘revolution in literature’, but also the fascination with archaic forms such as the ballad, sonnet, and romance, whose revival and transformation make Romanticism a ‘retro’ movement as well as a revolutionary one. The tension between the drives to ‘make it old’ and to ‘make it new’ generates one of the most dynamic phases in the history of literature, whose complications are played out in the critical writing of the period as well as its creative literature. Incorporating extensive research on classification systems and reception history as well as on literary forms themselves, Romanticism and the Uses of Genre demonstrates how new ideas about the role and status of genre influenced not only authors but also publishers, editors, reviewers, and readers. The focus is on poetry, but a wider spectrum of genres is considered, a central theme being the relationship – hierarchical, competitive, combinatory – between genres. Among the topics addressed are generic primitivism and forgery; Enlightenment theory and the ‘cognitive turn’; the impact of German transcendental aesthetics; organic and anti-organic form; the role of genre in the French Revolution debate; the poetics of the fragment; and the theory and practice of genre-mixing. Unprecedented in its scope and detail, this important book establishes a new way of reading Romantic literature which brings into focus for the first time its tangled relationship with genre.

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)
$125.00

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres
$110.80

In Crossroads, a wealth of exercises and rich diversity of models address the elements of writing fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama while developing an individual’s writing skills. Clear, concise discussions of particular techniques of creative writing are followed by practice of these individual techniques. Potent, vital models are offered in an extensive anthology of classic and contemporary readings.

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)
$109.99

Queering Medieval Genres proposes that, within the historical trajectory of many genres, certain agents are privileged while others are marginalized due to their understanding of heteronormative social codes. Examining the ways in which homosexuality disrupts generic and cultural expectations of heteronormativity, this book demonstrates that the introduction of the queer within medieval literature shatters the audience’s expectations of textual pleasure and demands that they reconsider the effects of homosexuality on their constructions of sexual and spiritual identity. Scholars of medieval literature will appreciate the fresh insights that queer genre theory provides on critical texts of the period; additionally, Queering Medieval Genres outlines a hermeneutic device with which to analyze literature of other historical periods as well.

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)
$99.95

Postcolonial literature has often tended to invite readings that focus on the relation between texts and political contexts, not surprisingly perhaps, given the fraught historical moments of colonialism and decolonisation with which it frequently engages. Nevertheless, critics such as Nicholas Harrison have argued for attention to the literary as literary, and have explored the ways in which literary representation makes any assumed ideological content necessarily indeterminate. Taking into account this call for attention to the literary, this volume investigates more specifically the idiosyncrasies of postcolonial poetics, including postcolonial literature’s use of and experimentation with genre and form. However, this attention to poetics is not intended to replace political engagement, and, rather than privileging the literary at the expense of the political, this volume analyses how texts use genre and form to offer multiple distinct ways of responding to political and historical questions. Postcolonial texts engage with the political world in a variety of ways, directly or indirectly, and it is in their specific uses of genre and form that they alter or develop our understanding of the particular contexts with which they grapple. According to Graham Huggan, postcolonial studies is inherently plural and interdisciplinary, in that it is made up of literary and cultural analysis as well as political theory, psychoanalysis, anthropology, history and philosophy. It is in the combination and manipulation of such forms of analysis that postcolonialism is able to imagine alternative identities and societies. This volume of postcolonial poetics therefore probes some examples of different kinds of literary writing, its blurring with other discourses and its manipulation of genre and form, in order to achieve a better understanding of its transformatory power.This exploration of the poetics of genre also sheds light on how different kinds of texts offer specific, distinct modes of thought.

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form
$95.00

This study brings a literary perspective to bear upon Edmund Burke’s political writings. De Bruyn recontextualizes Burke’s writings by exploring what the eighteenth century understood by the term `literature’ and by demonstrating how thoroughly he relies on the dominant literary discourses of his time, especially the satire and georgic/didactic modes, in composing his speeches and polemics.

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter
$94.00

This collection of essays, including contributions by Paula Backscheider, Martin C. Battestin, and Patricia Meyer Spacks- examines the relationship between history, literary forms, and the cultural contexts of British literature from the late seventeenth to the late eighteenth century. Topics include print culture and the works of Mary, Lady Chudleigh; the politics of early amatory fiction; Susanna Centlivre’s use of plot; novels by women between 1760 and 1788; and the connection between gender and narrative form in the criminal biographies of the 1770s.

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre
$83.20

This book is an introduction to creative, or literary, nonfiction and to the art of writing fresh and original work. Presenting clear guidelines and fresh approaches to creativity, this well-written book explores the six basic approaches to non-fiction writing, differentiates between what is creative and what is utilitarian, and describes honest as opposed to deceitful work. Using short example essays to illustrate the key approaches of personal experience, biographical sketch, opinion, reflection, place, and historical incident, this book stresses the importance of learning to write by reading. Useful for individuals who wish to examine nonfiction essays critically, with the intention of writing themselves. Also, those who keep literary journals will benefit from this book.

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)
$80.95

Genre theory in the past few years has contributed immensely to our understanding of the way discourse is used in academic, professional and institutional contexts. However, its development has been constrained by the nature and design of its applications, which have invariably focused on language teaching and learning, or communication training and consultation. This has led to the use of simplified and idealised genres. In contrast to this, the real world of discourse is complex, dynamic and unpredictable. This tension between the real world of written discourse and its representation in applied genre-based literature is the main theme of this book. The book addresses this theme from the perspectives of four rather different worlds: the world of reality, the world of private intentions, the world of analysis and the world of applications. Using examples from a range of situations including advertising, business, academia, economics, law, book introductions, reports, media and fundraising, Bhatia uses discourse analysis to move genre theory away from educational contexts and into the real world. Introduction – Overview: Perspectives on Discourse – The World of Reality – The World of Private Intentions – The World of Analysis – The World of Applications – References

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)
$72.00

An introduction to genre analysis, this highly readable volume presents key concepts in an accessible manner for undergraduate courses in film, TV, media criticism and cultural studies. The texts are representative of horror, science fiction, spy, classic detective, and tough guy detective genres, and readers may make their own analyses of texts based on the methods explained and the examples offered.

Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7

Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7
$160.00

A thorough examination of Shostakovich’s string quartets is long overdue. Although they can justifiably lay claim to being the most significant and frequently performed twentieth-century oeuvre for that ensemble, there has been no systematic English-language study of the entire cycle. Judith Kuhn’s book begins such a study, undertaken with the belief that, despite a growing awareness of the universality of Shostakovich’s music, much remains to be learned from the historical context and an examination of the music’s language. Much of the controversy about Shostakovich’s music has been related to questions of meaning. The conflicting interpretations put forth by scholars during the musicological ‘Shostakovich wars’ have shown the impossibility of fixing a single meaning in the composer’s music. Commentators have often heard the quartets as political in nature, although there have been contradictory views as to whether Shostakovich was a loyal communist or a dissident. The works are also often described as vivid narratives, perhaps a confessional autobiography or a chronicle of the composer’s times. The cycle has also been heard to examine major philosophical issues posed by the composer’s life and times, including war, death, love, the conflict of good and evil, the nature of subjectivity, the power of creativity and the place of the individual – and particularly the artist – in society. Soviet commentaries on the quartets typically describe the works through the lens of Socialist-Realist mythological master narratives. Recent Western commentaries see Shostakovich’s quartets as expressions of broader twentieth-century subjectivity, filled with ruptures and uncertainty. What musical features enable these diverse interpretations? Kuhn examines each quartet in turn, looking first at its historical and biographical context, with special attention to the cultural questions being discussed at the time of its writing. She then surveys the work’s reception history, and follows with a critical discussion of the quartet’s architectural and harmonic features. Using the new tools of Sonata Theory, Kuhn provides a fresh analytical approach to Shostakovich’s music, giving valuable and detailed insights into the quartets, showing how the composer’s mastery of form has enabled these works to be heard as active participants in the Soviet and Western cultural discourses of their time, while remaining compelling and relevant to twenty-first-century listeners.

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)
$160.00

Beginning with a reassessment of contemporary romantic studies, this book provides a modern critical comparison of Keats and Shelley. The study offers detailed close readings of a variety of literary genres (including the romance, lyric, elegy and literary fragment) adopted by Keats and Shelley to explore their poetic treatment of self and form. The poetic careers of Keats and Shelley embrace a tragic affirmation of those darker elements latent in the earlier writings to meditate on their own posthumous reception and reputation. Fresh readings of Keats and Shelley show how they conceive of the self as fictional and anticipate Nietzsche’s modern theories of subjectivity. Nietzsche’s conception of the subject as a site of conflicting fictions usefully measures this emergent sense of poetic self and form in Keats and Shelley. This Nietzschean perspective enriches our appreciation of the considerable artistic achievement of these two significant second-generation romantic poets.

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)
$160.00

By taking account of the ways in which early modern women made use of formal and generic structures to constitute themselves in writing, the essays collected here interrogate the discursive contours of gendered identity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. The contributors explore how generic choice, mixture, and revision influence narrative constructions of the female self in early modern England. Collectively they situate women’s life writings within the broader textual culture of early modern England while maintaining a focus on the particular rhetorical devices and narrative structures that comprise individual texts. Reconsidering women’s life writing in light of recent critical trends-most notably historical formalism-this volume produces both new readings of early modern texts (such as Margaret Cavendish’s autobiography and the diary of Anne Clifford) and a new understanding of the complex relationships between literary forms and early modern women’s ‘selves’. This volume engages with new critical methods to make innovative connections between canonical and non-canonical writing; in so doing, it helps to shape the future of scholarship on early modern women.

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)
$160.00

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)
$158.00

This book presents a perspective on genre based on what it is that leads users of a language to recognise a communicative event as an instance of a particular genre. Key notions in this perspective are those of prototype, inheritance, and intertextuality; that is, the extent to which a text is typical of the particular genre, the qualities or properties that are inherited from other instances of the communicative event, and the ways in which a text is influenced by other texts of a similar kind. The texts which form the basis of this discussion are drawn from experimental research reporting in English.Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Approaches to genre 3. Genre and frames 4. A sample analysis: Writing up research 5. Summary and conclusions.

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives
$155.00

For the first time, the major theoretical and pedagogical approaches to genre and related issues of social construction are presented in a single volume, providing an overview of the state of the art for practitioners in applied linguistics, ESL/EFL pedagogies, rhetoric, and composition studies around the world. Unlike volumes that present one theoretical stance, this book attempts to give equal time to all theoretical and pedagogical camps. Included are chapters by authors from the Sydney School, the New Rhetoric, and English for Specific Purposes, as well as contributions from other practitioners who pose questions that cross theoretical lines. Genre in the Classroom: *includes all of the major theoretical views of genre that influence pedagogical practice; *takes an international approach, drawing from all parts of the world in which genre theory has been applied in the classroom–Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the Middle East, the United States; *features contributors who are all both theorists and classroom practitioners, lending credibility and authenticity to the arguments; *combines theory and practice in every chapter, showing how particular theoretical views influence classroom practice; *grounds pedagogical practices in their own regional and theoretical histories; *openly discusses problems and questions that genre theory raises and presents some of the solutions suggested; and *offers a concluding chapter that argues for two macro-genres, and with responses to this argument by noted genre theorists from three theoretical camps.

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)
$143.00

How genres emerge and evolve on the Internet has become one of the central questions in studies of computer-mediated communication (CMC). This book addresses the issue of genrefication by giving an in-depth analysis of email hoaxes as a candidate for digital genre status. Email hoaxes are deceptive messages that spread in digital social networks; they are a fascinating object for discourse linguistics as they exemplify a major pragmatic tendency in CMC, namely deceptivity and a lowering of sincerity standards. This study examines formal and functional aspects of email hoaxes and provides ample evidence both from a systematized corpus and in situ data collected online. Besides a structural and microlinguistic analysis, it identifies key issues such as pragmatic duality, narrativity and textual variation and change in email hoaxes. In conclusion, a digital genre model is outlined that bridges both the old/new and the formal/functional gaps and may be applied to many other digital genre ecologies.

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)
$140.00

In this bold study James M. Decker argues against the commonly held opinion that Henry Miller’s narratives suffer from ‘formlessness’. He instead positions Miller as a stylistic pioneer, whose place must be assured in the American literary canon. From Moloch to Nexus through such widely-read texts as Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, Decker examines what Miller calls his ‘spiral form’, a radically digressive style that shifts wildly between realism and the fantastic. Drawing on a variety of narratological and critical sources, as well as Miller’s own aesthetic theories, he highlights that this fragmented narrative style formed part of a sustained critique of modern spiritual decay. A deliberate move rather than a compositional weakness, then, Miller’s style finds a wide variety of antecedents in the work of such figures as Nietzsche, Rabelais, Joyce, Bergson and Whitman, and is viewed by Decker as an attempt to chart the journey of the self through the modern city. Henry Miller and Narrative Form affords readers new insights into some of the most challenging writings of the twentieth century and provides a template for understanding the significance of an extraordinary and inventive narrative form.

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre
$125.00

This wide-ranging and original book reappraises the role of genre, and genre theory, in British Romanticism. Analyzing numerous examples from 1760 to 1830, David Duff examines the generic innovations and experiments which propel the Romantic ‘revolution in literature’, but also the fascination with archaic forms such as the ballad, sonnet, and romance, whose revival and transformation make Romanticism a ‘retro’ movement as well as a revolutionary one. The tension between the drives to ‘make it old’ and to ‘make it new’ generates one of the most dynamic phases in the history of literature, whose complications are played out in the critical writing of the period as well as its creative literature. Incorporating extensive research on classification systems and reception history as well as on literary forms themselves, Romanticism and the Uses of Genre demonstrates how new ideas about the role and status of genre influenced not only authors but also publishers, editors, reviewers, and readers. The focus is on poetry, but a wider spectrum of genres is considered, a central theme being the relationship – hierarchical, competitive, combinatory – between genres. Among the topics addressed are generic primitivism and forgery; Enlightenment theory and the ‘cognitive turn’; the impact of German transcendental aesthetics; organic and anti-organic form; the role of genre in the French Revolution debate; the poetics of the fragment; and the theory and practice of genre-mixing. Unprecedented in its scope and detail, this important book establishes a new way of reading Romantic literature which brings into focus for the first time its tangled relationship with genre.

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)
$125.00

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres
$110.80

In Crossroads, a wealth of exercises and rich diversity of models address the elements of writing fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama while developing an individual’s writing skills. Clear, concise discussions of particular techniques of creative writing are followed by practice of these individual techniques. Potent, vital models are offered in an extensive anthology of classic and contemporary readings.

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)
$109.99

Queering Medieval Genres proposes that, within the historical trajectory of many genres, certain agents are privileged while others are marginalized due to their understanding of heteronormative social codes. Examining the ways in which homosexuality disrupts generic and cultural expectations of heteronormativity, this book demonstrates that the introduction of the queer within medieval literature shatters the audience’s expectations of textual pleasure and demands that they reconsider the effects of homosexuality on their constructions of sexual and spiritual identity. Scholars of medieval literature will appreciate the fresh insights that queer genre theory provides on critical texts of the period; additionally, Queering Medieval Genres outlines a hermeneutic device with which to analyze literature of other historical periods as well.

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)
$99.95

Postcolonial literature has often tended to invite readings that focus on the relation between texts and political contexts, not surprisingly perhaps, given the fraught historical moments of colonialism and decolonisation with which it frequently engages. Nevertheless, critics such as Nicholas Harrison have argued for attention to the literary as literary, and have explored the ways in which literary representation makes any assumed ideological content necessarily indeterminate. Taking into account this call for attention to the literary, this volume investigates more specifically the idiosyncrasies of postcolonial poetics, including postcolonial literature’s use of and experimentation with genre and form. However, this attention to poetics is not intended to replace political engagement, and, rather than privileging the literary at the expense of the political, this volume analyses how texts use genre and form to offer multiple distinct ways of responding to political and historical questions. Postcolonial texts engage with the political world in a variety of ways, directly or indirectly, and it is in their specific uses of genre and form that they alter or develop our understanding of the particular contexts with which they grapple. According to Graham Huggan, postcolonial studies is inherently plural and interdisciplinary, in that it is made up of literary and cultural analysis as well as political theory, psychoanalysis, anthropology, history and philosophy. It is in the combination and manipulation of such forms of analysis that postcolonialism is able to imagine alternative identities and societies. This volume of postcolonial poetics therefore probes some examples of different kinds of literary writing, its blurring with other discourses and its manipulation of genre and form, in order to achieve a better understanding of its transformatory power.This exploration of the poetics of genre also sheds light on how different kinds of texts offer specific, distinct modes of thought.

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form
$95.00

This study brings a literary perspective to bear upon Edmund Burke’s political writings. De Bruyn recontextualizes Burke’s writings by exploring what the eighteenth century understood by the term `literature’ and by demonstrating how thoroughly he relies on the dominant literary discourses of his time, especially the satire and georgic/didactic modes, in composing his speeches and polemics.

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter
$94.00

This collection of essays, including contributions by Paula Backscheider, Martin C. Battestin, and Patricia Meyer Spacks- examines the relationship between history, literary forms, and the cultural contexts of British literature from the late seventeenth to the late eighteenth century. Topics include print culture and the works of Mary, Lady Chudleigh; the politics of early amatory fiction; Susanna Centlivre’s use of plot; novels by women between 1760 and 1788; and the connection between gender and narrative form in the criminal biographies of the 1770s.

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre
$83.20

This book is an introduction to creative, or literary, nonfiction and to the art of writing fresh and original work. Presenting clear guidelines and fresh approaches to creativity, this well-written book explores the six basic approaches to non-fiction writing, differentiates between what is creative and what is utilitarian, and describes honest as opposed to deceitful work. Using short example essays to illustrate the key approaches of personal experience, biographical sketch, opinion, reflection, place, and historical incident, this book stresses the importance of learning to write by reading. Useful for individuals who wish to examine nonfiction essays critically, with the intention of writing themselves. Also, those who keep literary journals will benefit from this book.

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)
$80.95

Genre theory in the past few years has contributed immensely to our understanding of the way discourse is used in academic, professional and institutional contexts. However, its development has been constrained by the nature and design of its applications, which have invariably focused on language teaching and learning, or communication training and consultation. This has led to the use of simplified and idealised genres. In contrast to this, the real world of discourse is complex, dynamic and unpredictable. This tension between the real world of written discourse and its representation in applied genre-based literature is the main theme of this book. The book addresses this theme from the perspectives of four rather different worlds: the world of reality, the world of private intentions, the world of analysis and the world of applications. Using examples from a range of situations including advertising, business, academia, economics, law, book introductions, reports, media and fundraising, Bhatia uses discourse analysis to move genre theory away from educational contexts and into the real world. Introduction – Overview: Perspectives on Discourse – The World of Reality – The World of Private Intentions – The World of Analysis – The World of Applications – References

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)
$72.00

An introduction to genre analysis, this highly readable volume presents key concepts in an accessible manner for undergraduate courses in film, TV, media criticism and cultural studies. The texts are representative of horror, science fiction, spy, classic detective, and tough guy detective genres, and readers may make their own analyses of texts based on the methods explained and the examples offered.

Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7

Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7
$160.00

A thorough examination of Shostakovich’s string quartets is long overdue. Although they can justifiably lay claim to being the most significant and frequently performed twentieth-century oeuvre for that ensemble, there has been no systematic English-language study of the entire cycle. Judith Kuhn’s book begins such a study, undertaken with the belief that, despite a growing awareness of the universality of Shostakovich’s music, much remains to be learned from the historical context and an examination of the music’s language. Much of the controversy about Shostakovich’s music has been related to questions of meaning. The conflicting interpretations put forth by scholars during the musicological ‘Shostakovich wars’ have shown the impossibility of fixing a single meaning in the composer’s music. Commentators have often heard the quartets as political in nature, although there have been contradictory views as to whether Shostakovich was a loyal communist or a dissident. The works are also often described as vivid narratives, perhaps a confessional autobiography or a chronicle of the composer’s times. The cycle has also been heard to examine major philosophical issues posed by the composer’s life and times, including war, death, love, the conflict of good and evil, the nature of subjectivity, the power of creativity and the place of the individual – and particularly the artist – in society. Soviet commentaries on the quartets typically describe the works through the lens of Socialist-Realist mythological master narratives. Recent Western commentaries see Shostakovich’s quartets as expressions of broader twentieth-century subjectivity, filled with ruptures and uncertainty. What musical features enable these diverse interpretations? Kuhn examines each quartet in turn, looking first at its historical and biographical context, with special attention to the cultural questions being discussed at the time of its writing. She then surveys the work’s reception history, and follows with a critical discussion of the quartet’s architectural and harmonic features. Using the new tools of Sonata Theory, Kuhn provides a fresh analytical approach to Shostakovich’s music, giving valuable and detailed insights into the quartets, showing how the composer’s mastery of form has enabled these works to be heard as active participants in the Soviet and Western cultural discourses of their time, while remaining compelling and relevant to twenty-first-century listeners.

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)
$160.00

Beginning with a reassessment of contemporary romantic studies, this book provides a modern critical comparison of Keats and Shelley. The study offers detailed close readings of a variety of literary genres (including the romance, lyric, elegy and literary fragment) adopted by Keats and Shelley to explore their poetic treatment of self and form. The poetic careers of Keats and Shelley embrace a tragic affirmation of those darker elements latent in the earlier writings to meditate on their own posthumous reception and reputation. Fresh readings of Keats and Shelley show how they conceive of the self as fictional and anticipate Nietzsche’s modern theories of subjectivity. Nietzsche’s conception of the subject as a site of conflicting fictions usefully measures this emergent sense of poetic self and form in Keats and Shelley. This Nietzschean perspective enriches our appreciation of the considerable artistic achievement of these two significant second-generation romantic poets.

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)
$160.00

By taking account of the ways in which early modern women made use of formal and generic structures to constitute themselves in writing, the essays collected here interrogate the discursive contours of gendered identity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. The contributors explore how generic choice, mixture, and revision influence narrative constructions of the female self in early modern England. Collectively they situate women’s life writings within the broader textual culture of early modern England while maintaining a focus on the particular rhetorical devices and narrative structures that comprise individual texts. Reconsidering women’s life writing in light of recent critical trends-most notably historical formalism-this volume produces both new readings of early modern texts (such as Margaret Cavendish’s autobiography and the diary of Anne Clifford) and a new understanding of the complex relationships between literary forms and early modern women’s ‘selves’. This volume engages with new critical methods to make innovative connections between canonical and non-canonical writing; in so doing, it helps to shape the future of scholarship on early modern women.

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)
$160.00

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)
$158.00

This book presents a perspective on genre based on what it is that leads users of a language to recognise a communicative event as an instance of a particular genre. Key notions in this perspective are those of prototype, inheritance, and intertextuality; that is, the extent to which a text is typical of the particular genre, the qualities or properties that are inherited from other instances of the communicative event, and the ways in which a text is influenced by other texts of a similar kind. The texts which form the basis of this discussion are drawn from experimental research reporting in English.Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Approaches to genre 3. Genre and frames 4. A sample analysis: Writing up research 5. Summary and conclusions.

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives
$155.00

For the first time, the major theoretical and pedagogical approaches to genre and related issues of social construction are presented in a single volume, providing an overview of the state of the art for practitioners in applied linguistics, ESL/EFL pedagogies, rhetoric, and composition studies around the world. Unlike volumes that present one theoretical stance, this book attempts to give equal time to all theoretical and pedagogical camps. Included are chapters by authors from the Sydney School, the New Rhetoric, and English for Specific Purposes, as well as contributions from other practitioners who pose questions that cross theoretical lines. Genre in the Classroom: *includes all of the major theoretical views of genre that influence pedagogical practice; *takes an international approach, drawing from all parts of the world in which genre theory has been applied in the classroom–Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the Middle East, the United States; *features contributors who are all both theorists and classroom practitioners, lending credibility and authenticity to the arguments; *combines theory and practice in every chapter, showing how particular theoretical views influence classroom practice; *grounds pedagogical practices in their own regional and theoretical histories; *openly discusses problems and questions that genre theory raises and presents some of the solutions suggested; and *offers a concluding chapter that argues for two macro-genres, and with responses to this argument by noted genre theorists from three theoretical camps.

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)
$143.00

How genres emerge and evolve on the Internet has become one of the central questions in studies of computer-mediated communication (CMC). This book addresses the issue of genrefication by giving an in-depth analysis of email hoaxes as a candidate for digital genre status. Email hoaxes are deceptive messages that spread in digital social networks; they are a fascinating object for discourse linguistics as they exemplify a major pragmatic tendency in CMC, namely deceptivity and a lowering of sincerity standards. This study examines formal and functional aspects of email hoaxes and provides ample evidence both from a systematized corpus and in situ data collected online. Besides a structural and microlinguistic analysis, it identifies key issues such as pragmatic duality, narrativity and textual variation and change in email hoaxes. In conclusion, a digital genre model is outlined that bridges both the old/new and the formal/functional gaps and may be applied to many other digital genre ecologies.

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)
$140.00

In this bold study James M. Decker argues against the commonly held opinion that Henry Miller’s narratives suffer from ‘formlessness’. He instead positions Miller as a stylistic pioneer, whose place must be assured in the American literary canon. From Moloch to Nexus through such widely-read texts as Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, Decker examines what Miller calls his ‘spiral form’, a radically digressive style that shifts wildly between realism and the fantastic. Drawing on a variety of narratological and critical sources, as well as Miller’s own aesthetic theories, he highlights that this fragmented narrative style formed part of a sustained critique of modern spiritual decay. A deliberate move rather than a compositional weakness, then, Miller’s style finds a wide variety of antecedents in the work of such figures as Nietzsche, Rabelais, Joyce, Bergson and Whitman, and is viewed by Decker as an attempt to chart the journey of the self through the modern city. Henry Miller and Narrative Form affords readers new insights into some of the most challenging writings of the twentieth century and provides a template for understanding the significance of an extraordinary and inventive narrative form.

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre
$125.00

This wide-ranging and original book reappraises the role of genre, and genre theory, in British Romanticism. Analyzing numerous examples from 1760 to 1830, David Duff examines the generic innovations and experiments which propel the Romantic ‘revolution in literature’, but also the fascination with archaic forms such as the ballad, sonnet, and romance, whose revival and transformation make Romanticism a ‘retro’ movement as well as a revolutionary one. The tension between the drives to ‘make it old’ and to ‘make it new’ generates one of the most dynamic phases in the history of literature, whose complications are played out in the critical writing of the period as well as its creative literature. Incorporating extensive research on classification systems and reception history as well as on literary forms themselves, Romanticism and the Uses of Genre demonstrates how new ideas about the role and status of genre influenced not only authors but also publishers, editors, reviewers, and readers. The focus is on poetry, but a wider spectrum of genres is considered, a central theme being the relationship – hierarchical, competitive, combinatory – between genres. Among the topics addressed are generic primitivism and forgery; Enlightenment theory and the ‘cognitive turn’; the impact of German transcendental aesthetics; organic and anti-organic form; the role of genre in the French Revolution debate; the poetics of the fragment; and the theory and practice of genre-mixing. Unprecedented in its scope and detail, this important book establishes a new way of reading Romantic literature which brings into focus for the first time its tangled relationship with genre.

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)
$125.00

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres
$110.80

In Crossroads, a wealth of exercises and rich diversity of models address the elements of writing fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama while developing an individual’s writing skills. Clear, concise discussions of particular techniques of creative writing are followed by practice of these individual techniques. Potent, vital models are offered in an extensive anthology of classic and contemporary readings.

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)
$109.99

Queering Medieval Genres proposes that, within the historical trajectory of many genres, certain agents are privileged while others are marginalized due to their understanding of heteronormative social codes. Examining the ways in which homosexuality disrupts generic and cultural expectations of heteronormativity, this book demonstrates that the introduction of the queer within medieval literature shatters the audience’s expectations of textual pleasure and demands that they reconsider the effects of homosexuality on their constructions of sexual and spiritual identity. Scholars of medieval literature will appreciate the fresh insights that queer genre theory provides on critical texts of the period; additionally, Queering Medieval Genres outlines a hermeneutic device with which to analyze literature of other historical periods as well.

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)
$99.95

Postcolonial literature has often tended to invite readings that focus on the relation between texts and political contexts, not surprisingly perhaps, given the fraught historical moments of colonialism and decolonisation with which it frequently engages. Nevertheless, critics such as Nicholas Harrison have argued for attention to the literary as literary, and have explored the ways in which literary representation makes any assumed ideological content necessarily indeterminate. Taking into account this call for attention to the literary, this volume investigates more specifically the idiosyncrasies of postcolonial poetics, including postcolonial literature’s use of and experimentation with genre and form. However, this attention to poetics is not intended to replace political engagement, and, rather than privileging the literary at the expense of the political, this volume analyses how texts use genre and form to offer multiple distinct ways of responding to political and historical questions. Postcolonial texts engage with the political world in a variety of ways, directly or indirectly, and it is in their specific uses of genre and form that they alter or develop our understanding of the particular contexts with which they grapple. According to Graham Huggan, postcolonial studies is inherently plural and interdisciplinary, in that it is made up of literary and cultural analysis as well as political theory, psychoanalysis, anthropology, history and philosophy. It is in the combination and manipulation of such forms of analysis that postcolonialism is able to imagine alternative identities and societies. This volume of postcolonial poetics therefore probes some examples of different kinds of literary writing, its blurring with other discourses and its manipulation of genre and form, in order to achieve a better understanding of its transformatory power.This exploration of the poetics of genre also sheds light on how different kinds of texts offer specific, distinct modes of thought.

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form
$95.00

This study brings a literary perspective to bear upon Edmund Burke’s political writings. De Bruyn recontextualizes Burke’s writings by exploring what the eighteenth century understood by the term `literature’ and by demonstrating how thoroughly he relies on the dominant literary discourses of his time, especially the satire and georgic/didactic modes, in composing his speeches and polemics.

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter
$94.00

This collection of essays, including contributions by Paula Backscheider, Martin C. Battestin, and Patricia Meyer Spacks- examines the relationship between history, literary forms, and the cultural contexts of British literature from the late seventeenth to the late eighteenth century. Topics include print culture and the works of Mary, Lady Chudleigh; the politics of early amatory fiction; Susanna Centlivre’s use of plot; novels by women between 1760 and 1788; and the connection between gender and narrative form in the criminal biographies of the 1770s.

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre
$83.20

This book is an introduction to creative, or literary, nonfiction and to the art of writing fresh and original work. Presenting clear guidelines and fresh approaches to creativity, this well-written book explores the six basic approaches to non-fiction writing, differentiates between what is creative and what is utilitarian, and describes honest as opposed to deceitful work. Using short example essays to illustrate the key approaches of personal experience, biographical sketch, opinion, reflection, place, and historical incident, this book stresses the importance of learning to write by reading. Useful for individuals who wish to examine nonfiction essays critically, with the intention of writing themselves. Also, those who keep literary journals will benefit from this book.

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)
$80.95

Genre theory in the past few years has contributed immensely to our understanding of the way discourse is used in academic, professional and institutional contexts. However, its development has been constrained by the nature and design of its applications, which have invariably focused on language teaching and learning, or communication training and consultation. This has led to the use of simplified and idealised genres. In contrast to this, the real world of discourse is complex, dynamic and unpredictable. This tension between the real world of written discourse and its representation in applied genre-based literature is the main theme of this book. The book addresses this theme from the perspectives of four rather different worlds: the world of reality, the world of private intentions, the world of analysis and the world of applications. Using examples from a range of situations including advertising, business, academia, economics, law, book introductions, reports, media and fundraising, Bhatia uses discourse analysis to move genre theory away from educational contexts and into the real world. Introduction – Overview: Perspectives on Discourse – The World of Reality – The World of Private Intentions – The World of Analysis – The World of Applications – References

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)
$72.00

An introduction to genre analysis, this highly readable volume presents key concepts in an accessible manner for undergraduate courses in film, TV, media criticism and cultural studies. The texts are representative of horror, science fiction, spy, classic detective, and tough guy detective genres, and readers may make their own analyses of texts based on the methods explained and the examples offered.

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Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7

Shostakovich in Dialogue: Form, Imagery and Ideas in Quartets 1-7
$160.00

A thorough examination of Shostakovich’s string quartets is long overdue. Although they can justifiably lay claim to being the most significant and frequently performed twentieth-century oeuvre for that ensemble, there has been no systematic English-language study of the entire cycle. Judith Kuhn’s book begins such a study, undertaken with the belief that, despite a growing awareness of the universality of Shostakovich’s music, much remains to be learned from the historical context and an examination of the music’s language. Much of the controversy about Shostakovich’s music has been related to questions of meaning. The conflicting interpretations put forth by scholars during the musicological ‘Shostakovich wars’ have shown the impossibility of fixing a single meaning in the composer’s music. Commentators have often heard the quartets as political in nature, although there have been contradictory views as to whether Shostakovich was a loyal communist or a dissident. The works are also often described as vivid narratives, perhaps a confessional autobiography or a chronicle of the composer’s times. The cycle has also been heard to examine major philosophical issues posed by the composer’s life and times, including war, death, love, the conflict of good and evil, the nature of subjectivity, the power of creativity and the place of the individual – and particularly the artist – in society. Soviet commentaries on the quartets typically describe the works through the lens of Socialist-Realist mythological master narratives. Recent Western commentaries see Shostakovich’s quartets as expressions of broader twentieth-century subjectivity, filled with ruptures and uncertainty. What musical features enable these diverse interpretations? Kuhn examines each quartet in turn, looking first at its historical and biographical context, with special attention to the cultural questions being discussed at the time of its writing. She then surveys the work’s reception history, and follows with a critical discussion of the quartet’s architectural and harmonic features. Using the new tools of Sonata Theory, Kuhn provides a fresh analytical approach to Shostakovich’s music, giving valuable and detailed insights into the quartets, showing how the composer’s mastery of form has enabled these works to be heard as active participants in the Soviet and Western cultural discourses of their time, while remaining compelling and relevant to twenty-first-century listeners.

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)

Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley: Nietzschean Subjectivity and Genre (The Nineteenth Century Series)
$160.00

Beginning with a reassessment of contemporary romantic studies, this book provides a modern critical comparison of Keats and Shelley. The study offers detailed close readings of a variety of literary genres (including the romance, lyric, elegy and literary fragment) adopted by Keats and Shelley to explore their poetic treatment of self and form. The poetic careers of Keats and Shelley embrace a tragic affirmation of those darker elements latent in the earlier writings to meditate on their own posthumous reception and reputation. Fresh readings of Keats and Shelley show how they conceive of the self as fictional and anticipate Nietzsche’s modern theories of subjectivity. Nietzsche’s conception of the subject as a site of conflicting fictions usefully measures this emergent sense of poetic self and form in Keats and Shelley. This Nietzschean perspective enriches our appreciation of the considerable artistic achievement of these two significant second-generation romantic poets.

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)

Genre and Women's Life Writing in Early Modern England (Women and Gender in the Early Modern World)
$160.00

By taking account of the ways in which early modern women made use of formal and generic structures to constitute themselves in writing, the essays collected here interrogate the discursive contours of gendered identity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. The contributors explore how generic choice, mixture, and revision influence narrative constructions of the female self in early modern England. Collectively they situate women’s life writings within the broader textual culture of early modern England while maintaining a focus on the particular rhetorical devices and narrative structures that comprise individual texts. Reconsidering women’s life writing in light of recent critical trends-most notably historical formalism-this volume produces both new readings of early modern texts (such as Margaret Cavendish’s autobiography and the diary of Anne Clifford) and a new understanding of the complex relationships between literary forms and early modern women’s ‘selves’. This volume engages with new critical methods to make innovative connections between canonical and non-canonical writing; in so doing, it helps to shape the future of scholarship on early modern women.

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)

AIDS Narratives: Gender and Sexuality, Fiction and Science (Gender and Genre in Literature)
$160.00

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)

Genre, Frames and Writing in Research Settings (Pragmatics & Beyond New Series)
$158.00

This book presents a perspective on genre based on what it is that leads users of a language to recognise a communicative event as an instance of a particular genre. Key notions in this perspective are those of prototype, inheritance, and intertextuality; that is, the extent to which a text is typical of the particular genre, the qualities or properties that are inherited from other instances of the communicative event, and the ways in which a text is influenced by other texts of a similar kind. The texts which form the basis of this discussion are drawn from experimental research reporting in English.Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Approaches to genre 3. Genre and frames 4. A sample analysis: Writing up research 5. Summary and conclusions.

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives

Genre in the Classroom: Multiple Perspectives
$155.00

For the first time, the major theoretical and pedagogical approaches to genre and related issues of social construction are presented in a single volume, providing an overview of the state of the art for practitioners in applied linguistics, ESL/EFL pedagogies, rhetoric, and composition studies around the world. Unlike volumes that present one theoretical stance, this book attempts to give equal time to all theoretical and pedagogical camps. Included are chapters by authors from the Sydney School, the New Rhetoric, and English for Specific Purposes, as well as contributions from other practitioners who pose questions that cross theoretical lines. Genre in the Classroom: *includes all of the major theoretical views of genre that influence pedagogical practice; *takes an international approach, drawing from all parts of the world in which genre theory has been applied in the classroom–Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the Middle East, the United States; *features contributors who are all both theorists and classroom practitioners, lending credibility and authenticity to the arguments; *combines theory and practice in every chapter, showing how particular theoretical views influence classroom practice; *grounds pedagogical practices in their own regional and theoretical histories; *openly discusses problems and questions that genre theory raises and presents some of the solutions suggested; and *offers a concluding chapter that argues for two macro-genres, and with responses to this argument by noted genre theorists from three theoretical camps.

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)

Email Hoaxes: Form, function, genre ecology (Pragmatics and Beyond New Series)
$143.00

How genres emerge and evolve on the Internet has become one of the central questions in studies of computer-mediated communication (CMC). This book addresses the issue of genrefication by giving an in-depth analysis of email hoaxes as a candidate for digital genre status. Email hoaxes are deceptive messages that spread in digital social networks; they are a fascinating object for discourse linguistics as they exemplify a major pragmatic tendency in CMC, namely deceptivity and a lowering of sincerity standards. This study examines formal and functional aspects of email hoaxes and provides ample evidence both from a systematized corpus and in situ data collected online. Besides a structural and microlinguistic analysis, it identifies key issues such as pragmatic duality, narrativity and textual variation and change in email hoaxes. In conclusion, a digital genre model is outlined that bridges both the old/new and the formal/functional gaps and may be applied to many other digital genre ecologies.

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)

Henry Miller and Narrative Form: Constructing the Self, Rejecting Modernity (Contexts And Genre In English Literature)
$140.00

In this bold study James M. Decker argues against the commonly held opinion that Henry Miller’s narratives suffer from ‘formlessness’. He instead positions Miller as a stylistic pioneer, whose place must be assured in the American literary canon. From Moloch to Nexus through such widely-read texts as Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, Decker examines what Miller calls his ‘spiral form’, a radically digressive style that shifts wildly between realism and the fantastic. Drawing on a variety of narratological and critical sources, as well as Miller’s own aesthetic theories, he highlights that this fragmented narrative style formed part of a sustained critique of modern spiritual decay. A deliberate move rather than a compositional weakness, then, Miller’s style finds a wide variety of antecedents in the work of such figures as Nietzsche, Rabelais, Joyce, Bergson and Whitman, and is viewed by Decker as an attempt to chart the journey of the self through the modern city. Henry Miller and Narrative Form affords readers new insights into some of the most challenging writings of the twentieth century and provides a template for understanding the significance of an extraordinary and inventive narrative form.

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre

Romanticism and the Uses of Genre
$125.00

This wide-ranging and original book reappraises the role of genre, and genre theory, in British Romanticism. Analyzing numerous examples from 1760 to 1830, David Duff examines the generic innovations and experiments which propel the Romantic ‘revolution in literature’, but also the fascination with archaic forms such as the ballad, sonnet, and romance, whose revival and transformation make Romanticism a ‘retro’ movement as well as a revolutionary one. The tension between the drives to ‘make it old’ and to ‘make it new’ generates one of the most dynamic phases in the history of literature, whose complications are played out in the critical writing of the period as well as its creative literature. Incorporating extensive research on classification systems and reception history as well as on literary forms themselves, Romanticism and the Uses of Genre demonstrates how new ideas about the role and status of genre influenced not only authors but also publishers, editors, reviewers, and readers. The focus is on poetry, but a wider spectrum of genres is considered, a central theme being the relationship – hierarchical, competitive, combinatory – between genres. Among the topics addressed are generic primitivism and forgery; Enlightenment theory and the ‘cognitive turn’; the impact of German transcendental aesthetics; organic and anti-organic form; the role of genre in the French Revolution debate; the poetics of the fragment; and the theory and practice of genre-mixing. Unprecedented in its scope and detail, this important book establishes a new way of reading Romantic literature which brings into focus for the first time its tangled relationship with genre.

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)

Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing (Literature and Society in Victorian Britain)
$125.00

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres

Crossroads: Creative Writing in Four Genres
$110.80

In Crossroads, a wealth of exercises and rich diversity of models address the elements of writing fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama while developing an individual’s writing skills. Clear, concise discussions of particular techniques of creative writing are followed by practice of these individual techniques. Potent, vital models are offered in an extensive anthology of classic and contemporary readings.

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)

Queering Medieval Genres (The New Middle Ages)
$109.99

Queering Medieval Genres proposes that, within the historical trajectory of many genres, certain agents are privileged while others are marginalized due to their understanding of heteronormative social codes. Examining the ways in which homosexuality disrupts generic and cultural expectations of heteronormativity, this book demonstrates that the introduction of the queer within medieval literature shatters the audience’s expectations of textual pleasure and demands that they reconsider the effects of homosexuality on their constructions of sexual and spiritual identity. Scholars of medieval literature will appreciate the fresh insights that queer genre theory provides on critical texts of the period; additionally, Queering Medieval Genres outlines a hermeneutic device with which to analyze literature of other historical periods as well.

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)

Postcolonial Poetics: Genre and Form (Francophone Postcolonial Studies, New Series)
$99.95

Postcolonial literature has often tended to invite readings that focus on the relation between texts and political contexts, not surprisingly perhaps, given the fraught historical moments of colonialism and decolonisation with which it frequently engages. Nevertheless, critics such as Nicholas Harrison have argued for attention to the literary as literary, and have explored the ways in which literary representation makes any assumed ideological content necessarily indeterminate. Taking into account this call for attention to the literary, this volume investigates more specifically the idiosyncrasies of postcolonial poetics, including postcolonial literature’s use of and experimentation with genre and form. However, this attention to poetics is not intended to replace political engagement, and, rather than privileging the literary at the expense of the political, this volume analyses how texts use genre and form to offer multiple distinct ways of responding to political and historical questions. Postcolonial texts engage with the political world in a variety of ways, directly or indirectly, and it is in their specific uses of genre and form that they alter or develop our understanding of the particular contexts with which they grapple. According to Graham Huggan, postcolonial studies is inherently plural and interdisciplinary, in that it is made up of literary and cultural analysis as well as political theory, psychoanalysis, anthropology, history and philosophy. It is in the combination and manipulation of such forms of analysis that postcolonialism is able to imagine alternative identities and societies. This volume of postcolonial poetics therefore probes some examples of different kinds of literary writing, its blurring with other discourses and its manipulation of genre and form, in order to achieve a better understanding of its transformatory power.This exploration of the poetics of genre also sheds light on how different kinds of texts offer specific, distinct modes of thought.

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form

The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form
$95.00

This study brings a literary perspective to bear upon Edmund Burke’s political writings. De Bruyn recontextualizes Burke’s writings by exploring what the eighteenth century understood by the term `literature’ and by demonstrating how thoroughly he relies on the dominant literary discourses of his time, especially the satire and georgic/didactic modes, in composing his speeches and polemics.

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter

Eighteenth-Century Genre And Culture: Serious Reflections on Occasional Forms : Essays in Honor of J. Paul Hunter
$94.00

This collection of essays, including contributions by Paula Backscheider, Martin C. Battestin, and Patricia Meyer Spacks- examines the relationship between history, literary forms, and the cultural contexts of British literature from the late seventeenth to the late eighteenth century. Topics include print culture and the works of Mary, Lady Chudleigh; the politics of early amatory fiction; Susanna Centlivre’s use of plot; novels by women between 1760 and 1788; and the connection between gender and narrative form in the criminal biographies of the 1770s.

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre

Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre
$83.20

This book is an introduction to creative, or literary, nonfiction and to the art of writing fresh and original work. Presenting clear guidelines and fresh approaches to creativity, this well-written book explores the six basic approaches to non-fiction writing, differentiates between what is creative and what is utilitarian, and describes honest as opposed to deceitful work. Using short example essays to illustrate the key approaches of personal experience, biographical sketch, opinion, reflection, place, and historical incident, this book stresses the importance of learning to write by reading. Useful for individuals who wish to examine nonfiction essays critically, with the intention of writing themselves. Also, those who keep literary journals will benefit from this book.

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)

Worlds of Written Discourse: A Genre-Based View (Advances in Applied Linguistics)
$80.95

Genre theory in the past few years has contributed immensely to our understanding of the way discourse is used in academic, professional and institutional contexts. However, its development has been constrained by the nature and design of its applications, which have invariably focused on language teaching and learning, or communication training and consultation. This has led to the use of simplified and idealised genres. In contrast to this, the real world of discourse is complex, dynamic and unpredictable. This tension between the real world of written discourse and its representation in applied genre-based literature is the main theme of this book. The book addresses this theme from the perspectives of four rather different worlds: the world of reality, the world of private intentions, the world of analysis and the world of applications. Using examples from a range of situations including advertising, business, academia, economics, law, book introductions, reports, media and fundraising, Bhatia uses discourse analysis to move genre theory away from educational contexts and into the real world. Introduction – Overview: Perspectives on Discourse – The World of Reality – The World of Private Intentions – The World of Analysis – The World of Applications – References

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)

Popular Culture Genres: Theories and Texts (Feminist Perspective on Communication)
$72.00

An introduction to genre analysis, this highly readable volume presents key concepts in an accessible manner for undergraduate courses in film, TV, media criticism and cultural studies. The texts are representative of horror, science fiction, spy, classic detective, and tough guy detective genres, and readers may make their own analyses of texts based on the methods explained and the examples offered.


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